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Will Passion Make You Hungry?


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And by hungry I don’t mean, like….hungry for sharing your flare with the world, or hungry to do what you love for a living.

Instead, I mean, will pursuing a PASSION as a profession make you more likely to be hungry in the simplest sense of the word?  (as in….not being able to afford to eat as much you’d like?  🙂

I’m doing a lot of reading these days on the POWER of passion, the transformative art and science of really indulging what inspires you to come alive.

(not to promote my recent book – but instead, as I continue to dance in the direction of my own dreams with my work as well – both personally and professoinally alike)

I bookmarked about 200 articles on Passion a few weeks ago – some I wanted to read while I was writing the book for some perspective – and of course, due to time contraints (and the fact that most of them were painful to read)  I only got to like 3 of them.

Today, as I’m catching up and cleaning up a bit….I started to leaf through the pile, and other than the airy fairy, rah-rah, “You can DO it!” style stuff that permeates the professional publishing passionsphere, I’m starting to notice another trend altogether.

The cynical perspective on pursuing passion for a living.

The “you aren’t all that special” so don’t believe the hype stuff.

The middle management, low risk route is the right one strategy.

And while I hate all  of the “you are a rock star” puff pieces out there that do more harm than good, I find it a bit more troubling to read all of the pragmatic perspectives of those who’d advise you to settle as well.

Here is a good example post – you can check out the whole thing at the link following the short excerpt below – but encouraging people to follow the safe route – or to say –

“Unless you’re a true star (brilliant, driven, great personality, or have great connections), give it up.”

I think is really, really offputting.

Or – under “Advice I’d Give My Child” – 

“Just remember is this one rule: Don’t innovate. Replicate. Copy a successful simple business.Innovations are too risky: Your product might not work, may not be popular with the public, or a competitor could beat you to market. Why be a guinea pig? Unless you have deep pockets or are truly brilliant, the risks are too great.”

I’m so glad my own parents didn’t give me that advice.  And not because being entrepreneurial – or thinking that you can do great things is a guarantee of actually doing it – and certainly not because it’s the safest path to any sort of success……but there is something scary – and sad – and sort of pathetic even…… about thinking about life – and a career – and contribution – and your legacy through this lens.

Check out the whole blog post at the link below.

In contrast, if your job is mundane, for example, marketing manager for the Western Widget Company, the employer knows there aren’t hundreds of competent people champing at the bit for your job. So, to keep you, the employer is more likely to offer decent working conditions, reasonable work hours, kind treatment, opportunities for learning, and pay you well. Those are the things that—much more than being in a “cool” career– lead to career contentment.You say you want status? Unless you’re a true star (brilliant, driven, great personality, or have great connections), give it up. Status is often the enemy of success. You’re more likely to find career contentment in a not-high-status career. In my mind, someone who’s an honorable assistant manager for the Western Widget Co. is more worthy of respect than many lawyers, investment bankers, and business development VPs I know. If someone thinks less of you because you’re job isn’t high-status, they don’t deserve to be your friend.Advice I’d Give My ChildIf you’re entrepreneurial, I recommend starting your own business. Yes, I know, only 20 percent of new businesses are still in business after five years, but you can beat the odds. Just remember is this one rule: Don’t innovate. Replicate. Copy a successful simple business.Innovations are too risky: Your product might not work, may not be popular with the public, or a competitor could beat you to market. Why be a guinea pig? Unless you have deep pockets or are truly brilliant, the risks are too great. Many people have ended up in poverty because of their innovations. Even Tivo, a wonderful new product lost hundreds of millions of dollars in the first few years. Last I checked, you don’t have oodles of money to lose. Leave the innovations to corporations or the independently wealthy.

Do What You Love and Starve?

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